Sinte Gleska Expands Legal Studies Program

Volume 27, No. 2 - Winter 2015
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Since 2012, Sinte Gleska University’s Business Management Department has offered a minor in legal studies. The program develops leadership capacity for tribal government and business leaders, and expands career opportunities for those interested in working in the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Court system. The ultimate goal of the legal studies minor is to develop knowledge and skills which can be used to preserve and strengthen the sovereignty of the Lakota Nation.

The six new classes in the legal studies minor add to the student’s base of knowledge in a variety of areas, including a greater understanding of the fundamentals of federal Indian law and Native American property rights. Students learn about the extent of tribal, federal, and state civil and criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country, as well as the legal landscape concerning doing business in Indian Country from both a tribal government and private business perspective. Finally, the courses offer an overview of Sicangu Oyate Bar Association examination topics.

Whitney Meek, Director of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe Revenue Department, completed the legal studies minor and sees great benefit in the program. “The knowledge I acquired in the legal studies minor courses has been extremely beneficial to me as a director of a Rosebud Sioux tribal government program in addressing the many legal issues and challenges faced by my office and my tribe,” she says. “I encourage others to take the courses in order to better understand the federal Indian law and Rosebud Sioux tribal law subjects covered.”


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